Tuesday, August 09, 2005

NLRB and you

People send me e-mails about things they are worried about. I understand even as they shift the blame onto Bush, that what they are really angry about is the destruction of individual liberties. I think what people fail to understand about these rulings, and government action in general, is that I oppose them. That doesn’t mean I am going to run out and vote for John ‘Surrender before Victory’ Kerry. It also doesn’t mean I will throw away my vote on some principled libertarian or third party candidate. The problem we as voters in this country face, is that no candidate is willing to accomplish what we put them in office for. This is because expanding government is how they remain popular, because the people love government, so why would they then turn around and destroy what the people love?

· Social Security

· Welfare

· National Defense

· Medicare

· Foreign Aid

· Transportation

Everybody loves one of these programs. They are the ‘people’s pork’, and thus are widely supported by the people. When a demagogue runs back to his state and proclaims they got more cash for a transportation project, everyone cheers. The problem with the American people is they do not see that for every one of these popular programs, there is the growing danger of a larger central government. Just like with my argument regarding the judiciary, for every dollar the fed’s spend, the power of the fed’s over your life increases. Sure we love labor unions and government protection of workers. But then, over time, the NLRB begins to flex its muscle. This un-elected body makes some ‘unpopular’ decisions that affect workers in ways they didn’t intend to occur. Now you cannot fraternize if your company says so. Boo Hoo. But you can organize! Rejoice!

My argument against all of these ridiculous government agencies, whether it’s the Federal Reserve, the NLRB, or the ATF, is quite simple. While you may love some of their decisions and rejoice in a feeling of empowerment, you will one day become beholden to that same government’s unpopular decisions. The great danger is in believing that you are empowered at all by the government, for you are not. Brown v. Board of Education didn’t make people free. It gave the government power to step into your classroom. The NLRB didn’t give workers the power to organize and be fairly compensated; it enslaved them to the government. The ATF doesn’t protect people’s rights against organized crime; it empowers the government to murder you in your home. The toughest things I ever do are concurring or agree with a government’s power. The Constitution of the United States of America is a document that LIMITS the power of the Federal Government. The founder’s didn’t fear dirty water, corrupt businessmen, the children getting sick, or the lack of healthcare, they feared the government taking away their ‘God Given’ rights.

Our founder’s created this nation so they could worship without fear of persecution, so they could live their lives without fear of an entrenched and encroaching foreign military, and so they could manage their own nation without severe taxation by a distant and malignant parliament. They opposed a society broken into factions, although some strangely supported slavery, and they wanted a land where every man would have the opportunity to succeed. For 200 years this nation has thrived under the concepts of these rich white men. I have no doubt that George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson would stand side by side with me in proclaiming this government has grown too big for its britches. Indeed, Thomas Jefferson would no doubt be remarking in wonder to Frenchmen that it is about time for Alexander Hamilton to get off his ass and do something about it…

So while you go out to vote for prescription drug benefits, taxes on cigarettes for rich liberals (I mean, for the children), clean water, clean air, etc., remember you are trading off your own rights and liberties to get them.

Help from:
http://www.nlrb.gov/nlrb/home/default.asp

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